Ingrid B. Quinn

NMLS ID #211652 Arizona, Loan Consultant


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Locking, What is it?!

Lock on Chains
In today’s volatile market, consumers need to understand what a lender offers as options for locking in their loan. Many consumers think that when they begin speaking to a lender, the rate they discuss that day will be the rate they carry from there on. However, this is not the case. Laws govern what constitutes a loan application. An actual loan application requires that 6 pieces of information are received, which triggers disclosures for the good faith estimate and the ability to lock in loans. These items are social security number to pull credit, borrower name, estimated value, monthly income, loan amount sought & property address. These six things are important because without these six items a lending company is not able to give a borrower a locked rate.
A borrower is required to give all of the information except the address when prequalifying. Once you have a property under contract then you have the ability to lock in a rate for the loan. Loan rates are locked in for a specific period of time. This time frame is based upon the close of escrow date. Typically loans are locked 15, 30, 45 or 60 days. There is the option of locking in rate for a longer period of time, but this is mainly used when you are purchasing a home that is being built for you and will not be completed with in 60 days.
What does locking in a rate/loan actually mean? When you lock your loan your lender should provide you the rate and/or points as well as the specific date of expiration of those terms. Regardless of how the market changes, your rate will continue to hold as it was locked. This can be both a good and bad thing.
Whether the market improves and rates lower or the market worsens and rates increase you are guaranteed to have the rate you have in writing. There can be an exception to these rules, but only with some lenders. This is called a renegotiation policy. This can typically occur when the market improves at least .25%(depending on your lender’s rules) and your lender will allow you to change your locking contract. Keep in mind that when you choose to lock in your rate, you are asking the lender to protect you and you are making a commitment to do the loan with your lender. The shopping rate time is over. Renegotiation is a courtesy provided by your lender.
Borrowers need to make sure that when they go to lock in their rate, that their lender gives them their terms in writing. You should never assume something has been done without seeing it in writing. Be safe, talk to your lender about locking and what their renegotiating options are. Never hesitate to ask questions and learn as much as you can.
For questions for suggestions please feel free to email me at Ingrid.Quinn@CobaltMortgage.com or visit me at http://www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or http://www.CobaltMortgage.com/IngridQuinn .


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APR vs. Interest Rate, What’s the Difference?

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Recently one of the Realtors I work closely with asked me what the actual difference between APR (annual percentage rate) and the Interest rate. Well, there is a big difference and when you are shopping for a home mortgage you are going to want to pay attention to a lot more than just the APR that is being offered by a lender. The short answer to this question is that simple interest is only the interest you pay on the loan whereas the APR is an informational number that covers some of costs of obtaining a residential loan, including points, interest, lender administration fees, mortgage insurance and various title fees.
In the case of a mortgage, the annual percentage rate, or APR, is the total yearly cost of financing a home, expressed as a percentage of the amount financed.
The federal Truth in Lending Act requires the lender to disclose both the nominal rate and the APR. Loans are frequently offered on different terms. Loan terms from different lenders can make it hard to figure out which offer is truly the best one.
The APR disclosed can be rounded up or down to the nearest one-eighth of a percentage point. Both the APR & simple interest rate must be advertised in the same font size or APR may be larger in print.
What this all means is that the APR of a loan is essentially a consumer tool designed to assist people when looking to make a major purchase. On the other hand, you have your simple interest rate. This is a very straight forward percentage that will be applied to your loan and determines your monthly payment.
People can use APR to get a general idea of what you will be looking at long term, but when it comes down to it people need to not be hesitant to ask lenders questions. Call them and find out what exactly their APR includes and what other fees are to be expected. You can also talk to your realtor and ask them about different lenders they have worked with. It’s never a bad thing to get a second opinion. Especially from a professional who is there to get you into your new home or assist you your refinance transaction.
For any questions or suggestions please feel free to email me at Ingrid.Quinn@CobaltMortage.com or visit me at http://www.CobaltMortgage.com/IngridQuinn or http://www.ScottsdaleMortgageExpert.com .


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Student Loans and Qualifying to Buy a Home

2student-loans

With graduation season upon us, student loan repayment clocks will start ticking. So I decided to tackle a small but significant question in qualifying for a mortgage. Banks and lenders take a look at a borrower’s capacity to repay a mortgage loan along with the rest of their debts.
When analyzing a borrower’s income and debt, we have debt to income (dti) ratios to adhere to. Generally, housing expense to income should not exceed 35% of a borrower’s income. Total debt, including housing expense, car loan payment, and student loan and credit card payments should not exceed 45-50% of income. Again, keep in mind this is a general rule. Just because someone does not have additional obligations over their housing expense does not automatically mean lenders will allow housing expense to go up to 50% of someone’s income. This is a common misconception. Below are the guidelines for those types of loans depending on the type of financing for a home that is requested.

Deferred Installment Debt for Conventional Loan Qualifications
Deferred installment debts, such as deferred student loans, must be included as part of the borrower’s recurring monthly debt obligations. If the borrower’s credit report does not indicate the monthly amount that will be payable at the end of the deferment period, the lender must obtain copies of the borrower’s payment letters or forbearance agreements so that a monthly payment amount can be determined and used in calculating the borrower’s total monthly obligations.
Exception: For a student loan, in lieu of obtaining copies of payment letters or forbearance agreements, the lender can calculate a monthly payment using no less than 2% of the outstanding balance as the borrower’s recurring monthly debt obligation. However, if any documentation is provided by the borrower or obtained by the lender that indicates the actual monthly payment, that figure must be used in qualifying the borrower.

Deferred Installment Debt for FHA Loan Qualifications
Debt payments, such as a student loan or balloon note scheduled to begin or come due within 12 months of the mortgage loan closing, must be included by the lender as anticipated monthly obligations during the underwriting analysis. Debt payments do not have to be classified as projected obligations if the borrower provides written evidence that the debt will be deferred to a period outside the 12 month timeframe.
Deferred Installment Debt for VA Qualifications
If student loan repayments are scheduled to begin within 12 months of the date of VA loan closing, lenders should consider the anticipated monthly obligation in the loan analysis. If the borrower is able to provide evidence that the debt may be deferred for a period outside that timeframe, the debt need not be considered in the analysis.
Student loans can be in deferment for a period of time and many borrowers think they should not be counted in their dti. It is important to check qualifying guidelines with you mortgage lender. If you have any questions or comments, please contact me at Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit http://www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


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Self Employed Types of Earnings

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I have recently run into a client’s situation that I thought bared discussion. Owners of a C Corp left profits in the corporation and did not distribute to themselves personally and it was a challenge qualifying them for a mortgage. There are different types of self-employed entities that someone may set up and in the mortgage lender’s eyes they are analyzed differently though a single theme is present throughout. If you don’t report the income to the IRS, we cannot use it.

Any individual who has a 25% or greater ownership interest in a business is considered to be self-employed. Lenders will require personal and business tax returns (if ownership is greater than 25%) to qualify a borrower in any of these types of entities.
Sole Proprietorships

A sole proprietorship is an unincorporated business that is individually owned and managed. The individual owner has unlimited personal liability for all debts of the business.

The income, expenses, and taxable profits of a sole proprietorship are reported on the owner’s IRS Form 1040, Schedule C, and are taxed at the tax rates that apply to individuals.

Partnerships
A partnership is an arrangement between two or more individuals who have pooled their assets and skills to form a business and who will share profits and losses according to predetermined proportions that are set out in the partnership agreement. A partnership may be either a general partnership or a limited partnership:

• General Partnership – Under a general partnership, each partner has responsibility for running the business, is personally liable for the debts of the entire business, and is responsible for the actions of every other partner (unless otherwise specified in the partnership agreement).

• Limited Partnership – Under a limited partnership, a limited partner has limited liability based on the amount he or she invested in the partnership, does not typically participate in the management and operation of the business, and has limited decision-making ability. Because limited partnerships often are formed as tax shelters, it is more likely that IRS Form 1065, Schedule K-1, will reflect a loss instead of income.
The partnership must report its profit or loss on IRS Form 1065 and each partner’s share of the profit or loss on IRS Form 1065, Schedule K-1; however, the partnership pays no tax on the partnership income.

Limited Liability Companies
A limited liability company (LLC) is a hybrid business structure that is designed to offer its member-owners the tax efficiencies of a partnership and the limited liability advantages of a corporation. The member-owners of the LLC (or their assigned managers) can sign contracts, sell assets, and make other important business decisions. The LLC operating agreement may set out specific divisions of power among the member-owners (or managers). Although the member-owners generally have limited liability, there may be some instances in which they are required to personally guarantee some of the loans that the LLC obtains. Profits from the operation of the LLC may be distributed beyond the pool of member-owners, such as by offering profit distributions to managers.

The LLC must report its profit or loss on IRS Form 1065 and each member-owner’s share of the profit or loss on IRS Form 1065, Schedule K-1; however, the LLC pays no tax on its income. Each member-owner uses the information from Schedule K-1 to report his or her share of the LLC’s net profit or loss (and special deductions and credits) on his or her individual IRS Form 1040, whether or not the member-owner receives a cash distribution from the LLC. Individual member-owners pay taxes on their proportionate share of the LLC’s net income at their individual tax rates.

S Corporations
An S corporation is a legal entity that has a limited number of stockholders and elects not to be taxed as a regular corporation. Business gains and losses are passed on to the stockholders. An S corporation has many of the characteristics of a partnership. Stockholders are taxed at their individual tax rates for their proportionate share of ordinary income, capital gains, and other taxable items.
The ordinary income for an S corporation is reported on IRS Form 1120S, with each shareholder’s share of the income reported on IRS Form 1120S, Schedule K-1.

Because this income from the distribution of corporate earnings may or may not be distributed to the individual shareholders, the lender should determine if the borrower received a cash distribution from the S corporation.
Corporations

A corporation is a state-chartered legal entity that exists separately and distinctly from its owners (who are called stockholders or shareholders).
The distribution of profits earned by the business is determined by the owners of the corporation. However, the profits usually are filtered down to the owners in the form of dividends. Since a stockholder is not personally liable for the debts of the corporation, losses are limited to his or her individual investment in the corporation’s stock.

Corporations must report income and losses on IRS Form 1120 and pay taxes on the net income. The corporation distributes profits to its shareholders in the form of dividends, which it reports on IRS Form 1099-DIV. The shareholders must then report the dividends as income on their individual IRS Form 1040.
For questions or comments, please contact me at Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit me at http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


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Rumor: Loans Are Hard to Get

rumors

I receive phone calls on a daily basis from people looking for a mortgage. They want to get prequalified to purchase a home and most want to have the rumor “It’s hard to get a loan nowadays” dispelled. There are a lot of mortgage options available:

1. Conventional conforming loans- up to 97% loan to values to $417,000 or higher depending on area of the country loan is placed
2. FHA loans- 96.5% loan to values
3. VA loans- 100% loan to values for veterans & military personnel
4. Jumbo loans- loan amounts over conventional conforming loan limits
5. UDSA- 100% loan to value rural area loans
6. Private/hard money loans
7. Home Equity loans

So where is this bad information coming from? Media, banks, mom & dad, professionals in your life? Getting a loan is not that hard. You need decent credit (not super excellent), a job, and cash for a down payment and closing costs potentially, depending on the type of financing you are eligible for.

Many times the clients I talk to are referred from agents that were supposed to take the client out to look at a rental. If they can afford an $800-$3500 rent payment for example, they may be able to buy a home.

It is important for the consumer to get re-educated on the market today when they are looking to make any kind of move, renting or purchasing, so they know their options and have a plan in place. Many people are surprised when I tell them you can qualify to purchase now. With the market improving and interest rates at historic lows still, now is a great time to buy a home! If you have any questions or comments, I would love to hear from you. I can be reached at Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or http://www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


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Where did that Money Come From!? Documenting Cash to Close

  Cash to Close

    It seems like recently I have been running into the same issue with many of my clients. Where is their cash to close coming from to purchase a new home? I have a couple in particular that just got married and, of course, received a stack of cash and checks as gifts from their guests.

   On their January bank statement a $10,000 lump sum deposit appeared and in turn questions arose. Luckily for them we are now in April.

   Loan requirements are your most recent 1-2 months bank statements. If we had needed to use January’s bank statement my clients would have been in a bit of a predicament. Can you imagine being required to hunt down gift letters from every single guest at your wedding?

   Another instance was a young man was selling his ATV for cash to close. I’m glad he informed me of this so we could take the proper steps to document the funds.

   When you have an asset that there is a title or a document showing your ownership prior to selling or transferring ownership, please take the time to make a copy! We need a copy of the bill of sale and to fully cover your bases have the buyer pay in a cashiers check. Any cash transaction is not documentable.

   If any of the bank statements show deposits that are not payroll deposits & are over 25% of you monthly gross income, the source of those deposits should be documented (For example: gifts, inheritance, liquidation of stocks, etc.). All mortgage program guidelines require a full paper trail on where these deposits originated, copies of checks, deposit slips, etc. If any of the bank statements have more than one page, a copy of all pages are required, even if the other pages don’t show anything important or are blank. Depending on how long the transaction takes you may need to send in updated statements as you get them.

   Copies of the most recent statements (or most recent quarterly statement) on any other asset accounts (like stocks, CD’s, 401k, IRA, etc.) are required. If these assets are going to be liquidated or borrowed against evidence of that is needed, and evidence of the deposit of the funds into the new account (such as deposit slips and copies of the check).

   You are entering into a major financial transaction when purchasing a home! The best thing for you to do is to be upfront and honest with your loan officer from the very beginning because anything that is not disclosed upfront tends to cause problems near the end of the transaction process. Your loan officer is your advocate and will fight for you to get the loan you need to buy your home. Be honest with them and let them work for you! For questions or comments, please contact me at Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit my websites at www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


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Closing Costs, What Are you Paying For?!

  Buyer-Seller-Rd-SignWhen you purchase a home, there are many things to keep in mind, especially pertaining to financing. As a buyer, you need to be prepared for not only your down payment on the home but also closing costs. These are the fees affiliated with the loan and the purchase transaction being processed and closed.

   You pay closing costs to the Title Company, state/county/city, lender, and you also pay tax and insurance escrows, and per diem interest. The closing costs that you pay the lender are usually far less expensive than you pay to the other parties. All costs and down payment funds are paid at the closing table to the Title Company and they are then dispersed to the various entities/vendors that the fees are owed to.

   The following are the seller concessions that the seller can pay on top of splitting the transfer & recordation taxes (if applicable, splitting these taxes is customary in many areas) In Arizona, it is standard in the resale contract for the seller to pay the Owner’s Title Insurance. Sellers may pay up to 3% of the sale price towards a buyer’s closing costs, escrows, and per diem interest, on a conventional loan with a 5% down payment.

   Sellers can pay up to 6% of the sale price to the borrower’s closing costs, escrows, and per diem interest on a loan with a 10% or 20% down payment. On FHA loans a seller is allowed to pay up to 6%. On VA loans, the seller may pay all closing costs for the veteran.

   On an investment property the maximum seller credit for closing costs is 2% of the sales price.

 

   Here is a list of some fees that are included in closing costs:

-Application Fee (if any)

-Loan Origination Charges

-Points

-Appraisal Fee

-Prepaid Interest

-Private Mortgage Insurance

-FHA, VA and Rural Housing Fees

-Home Owners Insurance

-Flood Determination Fee

-Property Survey Costs

-Title/Escrow Fees/Title Insurance

 

   Your lender will give you an estimate of closing costs on the purchase of a particular house you’ve selected. This is called a “Good Faith Estimate” (“GFE”) and it is required by law to be given to a buyer. Then, the day or before closing, the Title Company will give you an actual “Settlement Statement” (aka “the HUD” or “the HUD-1”), which is the final and complete form with all the numbers for the sale, including the actual closing costs.

   There are many different ways of handling the cost to close, including “buyer assist”. The best idea you can do is sit down with either your realtor, financial adviser or a loan officer and simply ask. They will be more than willing to answer any questions and make sure you are truly ready to buy! If you have any questions please feel free to email me at Ingrid.quinn@cobalmortgage.com