Ingrid B. Quinn

NMLS ID #211652 Arizona, Loan Consultant


Leave a comment

Advantages of Working with a Local Lender

az
One of the greatest advantages of working with a local lender is that they are better able to communicate with you.

We live in the age of technology and making use of the newest developments is important in any business, but nothing can replace a good face to face conversation. I maintain an open door policy with my clients. Day or night I am available. I personally get to know each of my borrowers and can update them within moments on their loan status and what, if anything is required. Accessibility is an important ingredient for success.

Another advantage of a local mortgage professional is knowledge of the local market.
When you use a local lender, they have expert knowledge of the local market. Why would you use a lender that doesn’t know your area? There are intricacies to the mortgage process that are very area specific; it’s very difficult for a national lender to know all of them for every state. Every area of the country has regional differences, when it comes to closing home loans and purchasing real estate.

Finally, your local mortgage lender will likely be connected to the other professionals involved in the purchase or refinance.

There are many different aspects to a home purchase or refinance. The major people involved are the borrower(s), the lender, the real estate agent, and the title company and inspection professionals. When you work with a local lender, you will receive help navigating the process. By knowing the ins and outs of each part of the process, a local lender is able to keep things on schedule, identify issues and communicate more effectively each step of the way.

If you have any questions or comments please feel free to email me at Ingird.Quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit me at http://www.ScottsdaleMortgageExpert.com or http://www.CobaltMortgage.com/IngridQuinn.


Leave a comment

Tax Time and Staying In Touch

tax-time
It’s that time of year again, when everyone is gathering their paperwork from 2013 and preparing to file their tax returns. Clients, who have either purchased a home or refinanced a current home mortgage in 2013, need to retain their final closing statement from their transaction for tax purposes.

Their tax preparer or online self preparing system will ask them for information from their settlement/closing statement. Clients will need to keep this paperwork handy to determine the amount of charges in relation to their recent transaction that can be used as a deduction on their taxes.
Tax payers have questions about what is going to be deductible and it’s always good to have them ask their preparer for that information. The http://www.irs.gov website is also very helpful. Also, remind them that they will get a year end summary 1098 from their mortgage company about interest, property taxes and mortgage insurance paid for the tax year. If the loan has been sold to a new servicer, it is also good to remind them that they will receive more than one 1098.

This is a great time for realtors to reconnect with their clients from the previous year. Sending your client a copy of their final HUD (closing statement) is a helpful service you can provide and is one of the activities you can plan on an annual basis when doing your yearly business plan. You can securely retain the final HUDs throughout the year and when January 2015 rolls around, you have them at your fingertips to forward to each client with a thank you and a reminder for referrals.

What else are you doing to stay in touch with your client during the year? I appreciate your feedback. To contact me please, email Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit my website at http://www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


Leave a comment

Pulling Credit Affects Your Credit Score

Credit Score

When I am talking to a client about preparing to buy a home, I always inform them to not apply for a new line of credit or credit card. Applying for a single credit card has a negligible effect on their score but applying for several in a short period of time does make a difference. Doing so can affect their over all credit score and can in turn change their eligibility for certain mortgage programs. When you apply for credit, an inquiry is generated. The creditor wants to determine what your current credit score is and what your credit history looks like in order to determine what program will best fit your needs and eligibility.

So, what is a credit inquiry? An inquiry is a notation on your credit report that someone has requested your credit file or that you have requested credit. Two types of inquiries may appear on a credit report. These are known as “hard” inquiries (can impact your credit score) and “soft” inquires (that don’t)

What counts as a hard or soft inquiry?

Applying for a loan or credit card can result in a hard inquiry, but applications not tied to a form of credit can result in a hard inquiry as well. A credit check for a new mobile phone or apartment, for example, can also generate a hard pull on your credit report. “The general rule is, if it is an inquiry that indicates that you may be taking on additional financial obligations, then that could be meaningful to your risk of being able to repay other debts,” says Maxine Sweet, vice president of public education for Experian, one of the three major credit bureaus. A cellular phone or apartment signifies the possibility of an additional monthly payment.
Soft Inquiries not related to a new financial commitment won’t hurt your credit score. These include credit checks from employers, companies sending preapproved offers of credit or insurance, existing creditors conducting periodic account reviews or your own request to see your credit file.

How inquiries are scored

Inquiries don’t count as much as payment history, revolving utilization and other factors that contribute to the calculation of a credit score. The actual impact of an inquiry can vary according to your credit history. If you have few accounts or a short credit history, inquiries can cost more points. The amount of points deducted may not be the same for each additional inquiry, as they might be scored in ranges. Past a certain threshold, the consumer could max out on the damage from numerous credit checks. Hard inquiries stay on credit reports for two years, but the length of time they impact the score depends on the scoring model (or credit bureau) used.

Multiple inquiries generated when rate-shopping for a mortgage, auto or student loan are consolidated by credit scoring models when done within a certain window of time. The FICO scoring model ignores multiple mortgage, auto and student loan inquiries in the 30 days prior to scoring but if shopping for all 3 in that window of time will alert lenders you are shopping for high priced items and reduce your score significantly. Stay off the new car lot when shopping for a home.
If you consider keeping credit inquiries to a minimum while shopping for a home loan you should be safe not to do any harm that will significantly impact your ability to get a quality mortgage. If you have questions or comments please contact me at Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit my website http://www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com 


Leave a comment

First and Second Combo Mortgages are Making a Come Back!

983077351003885_mortgage-applicationI have recently come across loan pre-qualifications where a 1st and 2nd combination mortgage loan option may be the right solution for a client. One main reason that a client may wish to separate their total mortgage amount into two loans; avoiding P.M.I. (private mortgage insurance). Many lenders including Cobalt Mortgage offer these types of loan scenarios when buying a home. Use of the combination of a 1st mortgage and 2nd mortgage is when the total amount to be borrowed is to be separated in to two loans. This is typically done with the first mortgage being within conforming loan guidelines (loan amount depending on location of the home) and a secondary retail or private loan being is set up for the remaining amount. A conforming (Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac) first mortgage will typically have more favorable interest rates than a non-conforming loan. Second mortgages can be taken in typically 2 forms, as a Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC) or a fixed rate mortgage.
PMI or Private Mortgage Insurance is required by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac as well as most investors when a 20% down payment is not made. Private mortgage insurance is paid to protect the lender against loss if a borrower defaults on a loan. Some borrowers choose to use a 1st and 2nd mortgage loan option when they have money for a down payment; however it is not enough to meet the 20% requirement. I have discussed P.M.I. in detail in my previous blog “P.M.I. vs. M.I.P. What’s the Difference?” (Please feel free to visit that blog for further information on that subject) PMI may also be tax deductible for some clients but for those who it is not, may want the 2nd mortgage for the purpose of having tax deductible interest.
It is best to discuss your options with your mortgage lender and your tax professional for guidance on the options right for you. For questions or suggestions please feel free to contact me at Ingrid.Quinn@CobaltMortgage.com or visit me at http://www.ScottsdaleMortgageExpert.com or http://www.CobaltMortgage.com/IngridQuinn .


2 Comments

Flood Insurance Changes and How They Effect Your Home Purchase

MortgageTroubles
A few months ago F.E.M.A. made some significant changes to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) that was originally established in 1968. For details on this subject refer to the F.E.M.A website, http://www.FEMA.gov , but I felt that there are a few key points that people need to know about. Typically, a homeowner’s insurance policy is shopped for towards the closing date of a purchase transaction. At that time, a purchaser finds out they will need to purchase flood insurance if their new home is located in a flood zone. An issue that clients have been running into is the lack of an elevation certificate on the home they are purchasing and effective October 1, 2013 an insurance agent must quote worst case premiums which can reach into the thousands of dollars if an elevation certificate is not available on the home they are buying.

The elevation certificate is an important administrative tool of the NFIP. It is to be used to provide the elevation information necessary to ensure compliance with community floodplain management ordinances, to determine the proper insurance premium rate. The surveyed elevation data, typically the elevation of the lowest adjacent grade of the structure in question, is provided by a Licensed Land Surveyor. If you are looking to buy a home that is in a flood zone and requires flood insurance to be purchased, this should not be left to the end of the loan process because it may take a week, two or three to obtain the certificate and closing may be delayed.

The cost of obtaining an elevation certificate is usually the responsibility of the buyer. Maximum coverage through the NFIP is for $250,000. For full details and changes made to the National Flood Insurance Program please visit: http://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/7c1b0352fe3987c36569fccc492ab2ca/change_package_508_oct2013.pdf. For questions, please contact me by email at Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit my website http://www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


Leave a comment

Bi-Weekly Payments, Good or Bad?

Occasionally, a client will ask about a program to make bi-weekly payments on their mortgage and I feel this subject should be discussed. If you have recently taken a mortgage, you will likely receive information in the mail about this type of payment plan, from your own lender or a third party. Please take the time to verify if it is coming from your lender servicer or a third party service that got your loan information from public records. The usual information states that for a few hundred dollars, you can save thousands in the long term interest, simply by having half your mortgage payment debited from your bank account every two weeks, instead of making one monthly payment.

Lenders often use an automatic bank draft for their biweekly plans, which means all your mortgage payments will be made on time. The main reason a homeowner may choose to take this option is if it makes their monthly budget work for their household and the long term effect on their accumulated interest is beneficial. By making 26 payments of half your mortgage, you are in effect making 13 monthly payments instead of the normal 12.

Depending on the terms of your loan, that extra payment each year may make a change in the principal amount of your loan and in turn lower the amount of interest accumulated over the life of your loan. There may be an up front fee to enroll or a monthly fee included in the payment which is typically charged by a third party servicer. The results of this type of payment plan can be achieved by homeowners taking the initiative themselves.

There are a two ways this can be done:

– saving money throughout the year for the extra payment and at the end of it

or

– dividing the cost of one monthly payment and add that amount to each monthly payment in principal reduction

When all is said and done, homebuyers should look at the big picture. How long are you planning on staying in the home? Can you comfortably make those bi-weekly payments? Homebuyers should not hesitate to speak to a mortgage professional about this type of payment program.

If you have any questions or suggestions for blogs please feel free to contact me at Ingrid.Quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit me at http://www.ScottsdaleMortgageExpert.com or http://www.CobaltMortgage.com/IngridQuinn


Leave a comment

Numbers and their Impact

Choose-a-Realtor
I read an interesting article by Lew Schelman in the November 4th National Mortgage News. He pointed out some interesting statistics and tidbits about how numbers correlate to certain home pricing strategies and some things to consider when coming up with the number to set a home’s sales price.

“Home sellers may not be afraid of certain numbers, at least not all of them. But according to Trulia, setting a price and “lucky” numbers go hand in hand.” Studying asking prices for homes since October 2011, Jed Kolko, Trulia’s chief economist, discovered that sales prices that end in 9 were the next most popular number after zero. 53% of all non-zero list prices on their site ended in 9. The next most common number was 5. Also, when home prices are reduced, they are more likely to have a 9 as the last number. When sellers are more eager to sell, the home price will also be more likely to have a 9.

When home prices were over $1,000,000, buyers are less likely to be influenced by the numbers game. Only 1 in 4 homes listed for $1,000,000 and up had a 9 as the last digit. The number 9 is also more popular in some markets, for example in up state New York. The number 4 is a number that can be unsettling in Chinese communities because the pronunciation of the number is similar to the word “death” in many Cantonese and Chinese dialects. On the flip side, the number 8 is “phonetically similar” to the words wealth or prosperity. The number 13 anywhere in the list price only appeared in the asking price of 13% of Trulia’s listings. In Nevada, lucky number 7 was more likely to be found in their listing numbers and the numbers 3 and 6 that represent positive and negative references in Christian numerology are more prevalent in a Bible Belt’s home prices.

So as an agent or a home seller, thinking about the numbers and their impact may be worthy of consideration in setting your sales price. Jed Kolko also wrote that “setting the right asking price for your home isn’t all science and it isn’t all art. Sellers and agents pick numbers to signal their strategy, and to appeal to the traditions and superstitions of local buyers.” Have you considered this when setting your selling prices?

I’d love to hear your feedback. I can be reached by email Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or leave a comment on my blog page. Visit me at http://www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.