Ingrid B. Quinn

NMLS ID #211652 Arizona, Loan Consultant


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Jumbo Loans vs Conforming Loans

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I recently began working with a client on a home loan that requires Jumbo financing. I was surprised to hear that the realtor was running into trouble finding a lender to provide the financing her clients needs. So I felt that an explanation of the two types of programs was required. Every client has a unique situation and should speak with a professional about their specific needs. So back to the subject at hand, a jumbo loan!

There are conforming loans and non-conforming loans. Conforming loans are loans that adhere to guidelines set by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and the amounts vary, depending on where you live and what the median prices for homes are. In most of the areas of the country, $417,000 is the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac conforming loan limit. In higher cost areas of the country such as California, Hawaii and the Washington, DC metropolitan area, there are Conforming-Jumbo Loans (also called Conforming “High Balance” loans). They range from $417,001 up to $625,500 for a single unit property (single family homes, condos, townhouses), 10% is the minimum down payment. These loans have rates approximately .25% to .375% higher than Conforming loans. And condos have higher rates by approximately .25% on these as well. Multifamily properties also have higher rates by approximately .25%, and higher down payment requirements of 20% to 25% down.

A home loan that goes over either of these types of loans is considered non-conforming and is referred to as a Jumbo loan. Jumbo loans (also called Non-Conforming) are from $625,501 and up for high cost areas and $417,001 and up for the rest of the country. The minimum down payment required is usually 20% though there are select programs that may offer a lower down payment. An example may be a doctor’s loan. These loans have rates approximately .5% higher than Conforming loans. Condos and multifamily properties may or may not have higher rates depending on the lender.

Jumbo loans are for the luxury or higher priced market. They are designed to meet the needs of the high income, high asset and high credit score client or in certain cases the just high asset, high credit score client. For more information about Jumbo loans, please contact me at Ingrid.Quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit my websites http://www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


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M.B.A. Shows Mortgage Applications Decreasing

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The Mortgage Bankers Association released a weekly survey as of Aug. 21st, 2013 that spoke about mortgage applications. We recently had been seeing the market increase at a rapid rate and it is surprising that applications would decrease so suddenly.
The MBA stated that their finding s shows, “The Market Composite Index, a measure of mortgage loan application volume, decreased 4.6 percent on a seasonally adjusted basis from one week earlier. On an unadjusted basis, the Index decreased 5 percent compared with the previous week.”
Form the press release we can see that this drop is not due to the lack of people buying home, but rather people no longer refinancing. “The seasonally adjusted Purchase Index increased 1 percent from one week earlier,” where as “The Refinance Index has dropped 62.1 percent from the recent peak reached during the week of May 3, 2013.”
It seems that this recent shift away from refinancing is really affecting the real-estate market. The MBA state that this change has greatly to do with rate changes in the past month, “The average contract interest rate for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages with conforming loan balances ($417,000 or less) increased to 4.68 percent from 4.56 percent, with points increasing to 0.42 from 0.39 (including the origination fee) for 80 percent loan- to-value ratio (LTV) loans. The effective rate increased from last week.”
This is speaking on a national level. The MBA covers 75% of retail residential mortgage applications in the U.S. . People should not be afraid to purchase or refinance right now. Rates being in the mid 4’s are truly not bad. In the time I have spent working in the mortgage industry I have seen rates more than twice that and people were still buying homes.
Buyers need to be aware of that is happening in the market and not hesitate to ask questions and seek out answers. For the full press release please visit http://www.mortgagebankers.org/NewsandMedia/PressCenter/85394.htm .
For any questions of suggestions please feel free to email me at Ingrid.Quinn@cobaltmortgage.com of visit me at http://www.CobaltMortgae.com/IngridQuinn or http://www.ScottsdaleMortageExpert.com


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Mortgage Points, What are They?

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Mortgage points generally refer to a loan origination fee and/or discount points. Discount points refer to the amount of money that a person pays to a lender to get a loan at a specific rate. Points are paid when discounting the rate for a loan. A lender usually has a menu of rates available on any given day at a variety of costs. Par pricing is when no discount points are required.
An origination fee is what a borrower will pay the lender for their services. Since the change in lending and disclosure rules in 2009, the term origination fee was changed to origination charge. The origination charge will include any lender admin fees and an origination point if applicable.
Before you can even consider whether or not purchasing points is a good idea, you have to make sure that you will have the extra cash because points will increase your total closing costs. Points can be financed into a refinance transaction but not into a purchase. Sellers can pay points for a buyer as part of a closing cost concession.
Positive mortgage points can be viewed as a form of pre-paid interest. Each point is equal to 1% total loan amount. Why would you want to pre-pay a part of your interest? The buyer is offering to pay an up front fee to receive a discount on the interest rate. The reduction in interest will give the buyer lower monthly mortgage payments. With mortgages duration of typically 15, 20 or even 30 years, the discount points will help save you a huge amount of interest over the life span of the loan. Positive discount points are usually worthwhile to a home buyer if he or she will maintain the mortgage for a while.
There is a second type of mortgage points, negative mortgage points or as termed, Yield Spread, work very much like positive mortgage points except in reverse. Instead of you paying the bank to lower your rate, the bank will pay you to take a higher rate. As an example, if you were offered a rate of 5.5 percent on your $100,000 loan. The bank is now offering you one point to raise your rate to 5.75 percent. Therefore, they are basically giving you $1,000 in order to raise your interest rate. This will also result in you paying a higher mortgage payment every month. These points don’t end up as a written check for the money. The yield will just be applied to your total closing costs on the loan.
Closing costs can result in a few thousand dollars of out-of-pocket expense. Amounts for closing cost vary by state, location and amount of loan requested. Purchase transactions and refinances can have a difference in costs too.
“Breaking even is a major factor in deciding what to do with points. Something the buyer will want to inquire about is how long it will take to “break even” in regards to possibly selling the home before their loan is paid in full. You will want to have retained the mortgage at least until you “break even”, if not longer, to make it worthwhile to reap benefits from discount points. Keep in mind there may also be a tax benefit to paying points and you will want to consult a tax advisor on this subject and what may be beneficial to your individual circumstance.
For questions of suggestions please feel free to email me at Ingrid.Quinn@cobaltmortgae.com or visit me at http://www.ScottsdaleMortgageExpert.com or http://www.CobaltMortgage.com/IngridQuinn


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How Much Can I Qualify For? DTI, What is it?

canada-cut-interest-rateIf you talk to a lender, they are going to drill down to the 4 most important aspects of your loan when trying to purchase or refinance a home. What do you make, Who do you owe, How much cash do you have to work with and What is the property value?
I am going to focus this blog on the numbers involved in qualifying income and what the rules are to get someone an approved loan. Growing up in the mortgage business, I learned the rule of 28/36. Back in the 80s those were important numbers. What do they mean? They stand for the debt to income (DTI) ratios that lenders use as a basic qualifying guideline.
28% of someone’s gross monthly income (or determined self employed income or passive income of some kind) could be tied up in housing expense. That includes principal, interest, taxes, insurance, HOA/condo fees, and possible 2nd mortgage, if applicable. 36% of your income could be tied up in total debt. That includes house expense plus monthly debt like car payments, student loan debt (see Student Loan blog) or credit card payments.
Now, we hear how the mortgage market has tightened up, but the ratios we work with have relaxed over the years surprisingly. It is not uncommon to see ratios in the 35/45 range or even 35/55. Different types of loans, such as FHA, Conventional, VA or Jumbo have different thresholds for approval. You will see more flexibility when the quality of the loan is stronger. Larger down payments, high credit scores and/or cash reserves after closing are all qualities that could command a lower risk loan and therefore allow a higher DTI.
Many loans are run through automated underwriting systems such as DU (Desktop Underwriter) or LP (Loan Prospector) that measure the risk of a loan. Lenders take those results and continue to process the loan if an acceptable response/approval has been received. Knowledgeable loan officers and processors can work with these systems and try to figure what characteristic of the file may need to be improved to reach an acceptable response. Then the loan officer will be able to tell the borrower how much of a loan they are qualified for.
For further questions or suggestions, please feel free to email me at Ingrid.Quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit me at http://www.ScottsdaleMortgageExpert.com or http://www.CobaltMortgage.com/IngridQuinn.


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Life After Short Sale

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Over the past couple of years, Short Sales have become more prevalent. Banks have been more receptive to short sales and have opted to negotiate instead of foreclose. Several clients who have called to be prequalified have had a Short Sale in their recent past. They have asked me when they can get back into the buying pool again. The rules to obtaining a mortgage after a short sale differ depending on the type of financing a buyer wants to use for their next purchase.

CONVENTIONAL FINANCING

With a 20% Down Payment, a Buyer can purchase a home using Conventional Financing after a 2 year waiting period from the Short Sale date (which can be found on their final HUD settlement statement). With 10% Down Payment, a buyer must wait 4 years from their Short Sale.

FHA FINANCING

Using FHA financing, a buyer must wait for 3 years to have passed from the Short Sale date.

VA FINANCING

The waiting time with VA financing will be 2 years.

USDA FINANCING

USDA financing will be a 3 year wait from the Short Sale date.

It is a good idea to great prequalified with your lender from 6 months to a year out before you purchase another home. Many times there could be some credit repair work that may need to be done on your credit history to make sure that your credit score and history are reporting accurately.

Do you have a Short Sale experience you would like to share? Please comment or contact me at Ingrid.Quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit my website at http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


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In House Lenders Pros & Cons

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Often times a Realtor will suggest to a homebuyer that they use the real estate company’s “in-house” lender. Realtors don’t usually push these lenders on their buyers, but they are definitely suggested and buyers will sign a disclosure that the real estate company does have affiliations and receives some compensation for that referral. Every wonder why? It is important to know how these lenders are structured, and how they operate. I have been on both sides of the table with this. I was an in-house loan officer for a couple of years about 7 years ago. That was before licensing became mandatory and the mortgage meltdown.
These in-house lenders are a joint venture between the Real Estate firm and an outside lender. The Real Estate firm takes a piece of the profits (most for the firm, a small amount for the Realtor) in trade for allowing the lender to be an “in-house” lender.
An in-house lender has trouble retaining quality loan officers because they offer low pay. Because there is a captured audience the loan officer does not have to pound the pavement for business but it is important that they establish a quality relationship with the Realtors in their office and are accessible to them.
An in house loan officer is only as good as their supporting backroom. If processing is out of state, the loan officer has limited control over the process and relies on a strong team to take care of his/her deal. I had that benefit when I was working for a Realty office, thank goodness, but most in house lenders have the kind of a system that follows the retail bank model, and the service can be less than par. In today’s hyper complicated mortgage environment, everyone needs a top notch mortgage representative, who is full time, who will make things as smooth as possible, and who will fight for their loan; all while providing competitive market terms.
It’s an understatement to say the financial world is getting complicated. You can still hire the best mortgage loan officer, and also get the best terms. Simply stay away from online lenders, and lead aggregation websites. Use local referrals, which are accountable, experienced, systemized, and have a vested interest in maintaining their reputation.
Have you had experience with an in house lender? I would love to hear about it. Contact me at Ingrid.Quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit my website at http://www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


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How A Refinance Can Change Your Life

I continue to get calls for refinancing. A lot of people who were eligible for HARP (Home Affordable Refinance Program) refinancing have already done so. Hopefully, if they haven’t yet they will do so and take advantage of what I believe is a great opportunity for negative equity clients. But, there is renewed interest in other refinance programs because home values have rebounded in many markets.

Homeowners who have equity in their homes can do a regular refinance without HARP and lower their rate or they can get out of their FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums to possible lower conventional premiums or they are opting to reduce the term of their mortgage.

A client should consider what their goal is with a refinance:

• Do they need to lower monthly payments and/or interest rate?
• How long will they be in the home?
• What are their long term wealth management/ equity position goals?
• What are the tax benefits or ramifications of a refinance?
• Do they want to build equity and lower rate?

An example of an analysis between staying with a current 30 year fixed loan Vs. a 15 year or 30 year refinance is outlined below. Please be advised this is not a rate quote. :
Say for example, you have a 30 year loan taken out for $150,000 with a rate of 5.25% 5 years ago. You have a balance now of about $140,000. The loan over 30 years would cost $150,000 in interest charges when finally paid back. The monthly P& I payment is $828 a month.

The same loan refinanced today with a $140,000 loan amount for a 15 year loan at 3% will have total interest paid of $36,000 over the term and the payment will only rise by $139 a month. HUGE savings!

The other alternative is to take the $140,000 and refinance for 30 years again at a rate of 4%. The loan will cost over the 30 years $102,000 in interest charge and the payment will drop by $160.

Wouldn’t you rather have the extra $100,000 in another form of investment or have your home paid off when you retire or when the kids go to college? Rumor has it 15 year loans have payments that are not manageable. It is not true. Speak to a mortgage professional about your options and don’t completely rule out a 15 year mortgage. It can change your life. For more information or to comment please contact me at Ingrid.Quinn@cobaltmortgage or visit my website at http://www.ScottsdaleMortgageExpert.com.