Ingrid B. Quinn

NMLS ID #211652 Arizona, Loan Consultant


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Numbers and their Impact

Choose-a-Realtor
I read an interesting article by Lew Schelman in the November 4th National Mortgage News. He pointed out some interesting statistics and tidbits about how numbers correlate to certain home pricing strategies and some things to consider when coming up with the number to set a home’s sales price.

“Home sellers may not be afraid of certain numbers, at least not all of them. But according to Trulia, setting a price and “lucky” numbers go hand in hand.” Studying asking prices for homes since October 2011, Jed Kolko, Trulia’s chief economist, discovered that sales prices that end in 9 were the next most popular number after zero. 53% of all non-zero list prices on their site ended in 9. The next most common number was 5. Also, when home prices are reduced, they are more likely to have a 9 as the last number. When sellers are more eager to sell, the home price will also be more likely to have a 9.

When home prices were over $1,000,000, buyers are less likely to be influenced by the numbers game. Only 1 in 4 homes listed for $1,000,000 and up had a 9 as the last digit. The number 9 is also more popular in some markets, for example in up state New York. The number 4 is a number that can be unsettling in Chinese communities because the pronunciation of the number is similar to the word “death” in many Cantonese and Chinese dialects. On the flip side, the number 8 is “phonetically similar” to the words wealth or prosperity. The number 13 anywhere in the list price only appeared in the asking price of 13% of Trulia’s listings. In Nevada, lucky number 7 was more likely to be found in their listing numbers and the numbers 3 and 6 that represent positive and negative references in Christian numerology are more prevalent in a Bible Belt’s home prices.

So as an agent or a home seller, thinking about the numbers and their impact may be worthy of consideration in setting your sales price. Jed Kolko also wrote that “setting the right asking price for your home isn’t all science and it isn’t all art. Sellers and agents pick numbers to signal their strategy, and to appeal to the traditions and superstitions of local buyers.” Have you considered this when setting your selling prices?

I’d love to hear your feedback. I can be reached by email Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or leave a comment on my blog page. Visit me at http://www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


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Jumbo Loans vs Conforming Loans

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I recently began working with a client on a home loan that requires Jumbo financing. I was surprised to hear that the realtor was running into trouble finding a lender to provide the financing her clients needs. So I felt that an explanation of the two types of programs was required. Every client has a unique situation and should speak with a professional about their specific needs. So back to the subject at hand, a jumbo loan!

There are conforming loans and non-conforming loans. Conforming loans are loans that adhere to guidelines set by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and the amounts vary, depending on where you live and what the median prices for homes are. In most of the areas of the country, $417,000 is the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac conforming loan limit. In higher cost areas of the country such as California, Hawaii and the Washington, DC metropolitan area, there are Conforming-Jumbo Loans (also called Conforming “High Balance” loans). They range from $417,001 up to $625,500 for a single unit property (single family homes, condos, townhouses), 10% is the minimum down payment. These loans have rates approximately .25% to .375% higher than Conforming loans. And condos have higher rates by approximately .25% on these as well. Multifamily properties also have higher rates by approximately .25%, and higher down payment requirements of 20% to 25% down.

A home loan that goes over either of these types of loans is considered non-conforming and is referred to as a Jumbo loan. Jumbo loans (also called Non-Conforming) are from $625,501 and up for high cost areas and $417,001 and up for the rest of the country. The minimum down payment required is usually 20% though there are select programs that may offer a lower down payment. An example may be a doctor’s loan. These loans have rates approximately .5% higher than Conforming loans. Condos and multifamily properties may or may not have higher rates depending on the lender.

Jumbo loans are for the luxury or higher priced market. They are designed to meet the needs of the high income, high asset and high credit score client or in certain cases the just high asset, high credit score client. For more information about Jumbo loans, please contact me at Ingrid.Quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit my websites http://www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


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Your Home Loan Was Sold?

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recently experienced a situation with clients who were confused as to why their loan had been sold to a secondary lender. This has no reflection on the borrower. Selling a loan is typical in the mortgage industry. Mortgage brokers do not close loans in their own name. The funding lender’s name will be on the borrower’s closing documents. Mortgage bankers and banks close loans in their own name and typically retain the servicing (collection of monthly payments) of the loans while selling the loan on the secondary market.
A common reason for banks and lenders to sell their closed mortgages is to free up capital to do more loans. Lenders can only fund so many loans before they no longer have any funds on their warehouse line left to loan. This is where the secondary markets (the place that mortgages are bought and sold after they are closed) come in to play. When a lender funds a loan and then sells it to a secondary market investor (commonly Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, Ginnie Mae or jumbo loan investors), they are able to make a profit as well as free up capital to originate new loans.
This system actually benefits borrowers by increasing demand in the mortgage market. If the process of selling loan did not exist it would force lenders to create a set amount of loans and they would have to wait for the loans to be paid off prior to creating new loans. The competitive part of the business would be reduced.
Borrowers have nothing to worry about if/when the loan is sold. The loan terms are set in your note and will not change. If you have a home loan and want to see what entity actually owns the loan, call your customer service department and ask. A servicing company is not generally the owner of your mortgage.
For questions or suggestions please feel free to contact me at Ingrid.Quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit me at http://www.CobaltMortgage.com/IngridQuinn or http://www.ScottsdaleMortgageExpert.com .


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Always Get a Home Inspection!

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Finding the perfect house is like love at first sight. You can search and search and when you least expect it, you will fall in love, but when love at first sight strikes, you need to be cautious. Just as you would get to know a person and see if you are compatible before settling down you should get to know the house. A home is where you build your life and this is a commitment not to be taken lightly. I always suggest that my clients need a professional’s eye when looking into the possible issues of a home.
Think of having a home inspection like bringing your newfound love home to meet your parents. Just as your parents will scrutinize this new person in your life, the home inspector will scrutinize the house. Both simply want the best for you and are willing to do what it takes to show what’s really underneath the surface.

Normally, you have 10 days according to the Arizona standard real estate contract, to do all the inspections on a home, structural, mechanical, well and septic, termite, permits with the county, crime reports, etc. The cost of the inspection is outside of your loan transaction. Usually, I wait for the go ahead that the inspection was satisfactory and that there are no deal killing issues with the home before I order the appraisal for my client. Why spend $400-$500 on the appraisal if the inspection is not acceptable?
I highly recommend doing all the necessary inspections and that unless you are a licensed contractor and know a lot about a home and its construction that you have a licensed professional perform the home inspection. Your Realtor should give you the names of a few inspectors to contact.
I would be interested in your comments about any home inspection stories you can share. Please comment on my blog page. I can be contacted at Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit my website at http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


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Summer in Arizona

extreme_heat_signAside from lifeguarding, life slows down in Arizona. It’s too hot to move at a fast pace. Many industries in the Phoenix area slow down. Restaurants are slower, hotels are offering staycation discounts to the locals stuck hanging in the valley, and it’s too hot to hold Open Houses. Granted there are the dedicated agents who go out on Saturday and Sunday and place their signs on street corners risking heat exhaustion.

We have started to see a housing recovery though a slow down of homes listed is likely in the summer months. Sellers will consider listing homes again in late August or early September and the batch of buyers who need to move their families in the summer are already doing so.

Home values have increase, rates have gone up some but a mortgage in the 4%s is still a great deal! I remember the summer of 2000 selling interest rates at 8.75%. Below is a historical graph of where mortgage rates have been in the last since 1992.

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(Provided by mortgage-x.com)

I would like to show appreciation by thanking those buyers, sellers and Realtors who push through the heat of the Valley’s summer. Please feel free to share a comment about how you beat the summer heat when working in our Phoenix market. Visit me at http://www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn. My email is Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com.


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Self Employed Types of Earnings

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I have recently run into a client’s situation that I thought bared discussion. Owners of a C Corp left profits in the corporation and did not distribute to themselves personally and it was a challenge qualifying them for a mortgage. There are different types of self-employed entities that someone may set up and in the mortgage lender’s eyes they are analyzed differently though a single theme is present throughout. If you don’t report the income to the IRS, we cannot use it.

Any individual who has a 25% or greater ownership interest in a business is considered to be self-employed. Lenders will require personal and business tax returns (if ownership is greater than 25%) to qualify a borrower in any of these types of entities.
Sole Proprietorships

A sole proprietorship is an unincorporated business that is individually owned and managed. The individual owner has unlimited personal liability for all debts of the business.

The income, expenses, and taxable profits of a sole proprietorship are reported on the owner’s IRS Form 1040, Schedule C, and are taxed at the tax rates that apply to individuals.

Partnerships
A partnership is an arrangement between two or more individuals who have pooled their assets and skills to form a business and who will share profits and losses according to predetermined proportions that are set out in the partnership agreement. A partnership may be either a general partnership or a limited partnership:

• General Partnership – Under a general partnership, each partner has responsibility for running the business, is personally liable for the debts of the entire business, and is responsible for the actions of every other partner (unless otherwise specified in the partnership agreement).

• Limited Partnership – Under a limited partnership, a limited partner has limited liability based on the amount he or she invested in the partnership, does not typically participate in the management and operation of the business, and has limited decision-making ability. Because limited partnerships often are formed as tax shelters, it is more likely that IRS Form 1065, Schedule K-1, will reflect a loss instead of income.
The partnership must report its profit or loss on IRS Form 1065 and each partner’s share of the profit or loss on IRS Form 1065, Schedule K-1; however, the partnership pays no tax on the partnership income.

Limited Liability Companies
A limited liability company (LLC) is a hybrid business structure that is designed to offer its member-owners the tax efficiencies of a partnership and the limited liability advantages of a corporation. The member-owners of the LLC (or their assigned managers) can sign contracts, sell assets, and make other important business decisions. The LLC operating agreement may set out specific divisions of power among the member-owners (or managers). Although the member-owners generally have limited liability, there may be some instances in which they are required to personally guarantee some of the loans that the LLC obtains. Profits from the operation of the LLC may be distributed beyond the pool of member-owners, such as by offering profit distributions to managers.

The LLC must report its profit or loss on IRS Form 1065 and each member-owner’s share of the profit or loss on IRS Form 1065, Schedule K-1; however, the LLC pays no tax on its income. Each member-owner uses the information from Schedule K-1 to report his or her share of the LLC’s net profit or loss (and special deductions and credits) on his or her individual IRS Form 1040, whether or not the member-owner receives a cash distribution from the LLC. Individual member-owners pay taxes on their proportionate share of the LLC’s net income at their individual tax rates.

S Corporations
An S corporation is a legal entity that has a limited number of stockholders and elects not to be taxed as a regular corporation. Business gains and losses are passed on to the stockholders. An S corporation has many of the characteristics of a partnership. Stockholders are taxed at their individual tax rates for their proportionate share of ordinary income, capital gains, and other taxable items.
The ordinary income for an S corporation is reported on IRS Form 1120S, with each shareholder’s share of the income reported on IRS Form 1120S, Schedule K-1.

Because this income from the distribution of corporate earnings may or may not be distributed to the individual shareholders, the lender should determine if the borrower received a cash distribution from the S corporation.
Corporations

A corporation is a state-chartered legal entity that exists separately and distinctly from its owners (who are called stockholders or shareholders).
The distribution of profits earned by the business is determined by the owners of the corporation. However, the profits usually are filtered down to the owners in the form of dividends. Since a stockholder is not personally liable for the debts of the corporation, losses are limited to his or her individual investment in the corporation’s stock.

Corporations must report income and losses on IRS Form 1120 and pay taxes on the net income. The corporation distributes profits to its shareholders in the form of dividends, which it reports on IRS Form 1099-DIV. The shareholders must then report the dividends as income on their individual IRS Form 1040.
For questions or comments, please contact me at Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit me at http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


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Buying Without Selling

4412037-handling-multiple-homesMany homeowners would like to buy a new home and not have to manage the timing of a simultaneous close or would like to do some work on the new home without having to live there. The buyers are not sure they would even be able meet lender’s qualification guidelines carrying both properties.

With a strengthening housing market and housing inventory low, why should a seller accept an offer from a buyer that has a house to sell? Who knows if the buyers are realistic and price their current home to sell, or will do all the right things to market and sell it quickly? Sellers wait to get a cash or non-contingent offer, because they know one will come along soon enough.

There are rules to qualifying for a new home without selling your current home. You must be able to make the required down payment from savings or secured borrowing. The easiest way to qualify is to you have the income to carry both homes without the benefit of rental income to offset the payment of the current home. If the current home is owned free & clear, the lender will count the tax, insurance and HOA fees as monthly liabilities. We must receive a Desktop underwriting approval for the income to debt obligation ratios. Then we are good to go. There are asset reserve requirements.

For a Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac conforming loan up to $417,000 or $625,500 in high cost areas of the country, and a buyer is converting their current home to an investment or 2nd home the reserve requirements for assets after close are if there is 30% equity in the converted residence, then 2 months of the new home payment and 2 months of the converted home payments are required. If there is not 30% equity, then 6 months payments for each is required to be in reserves. There are additional reserve requirements if the homebuyer will own more than 2 properties.
Please feel free to contact me for additional information at ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit me at scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn