Ingrid B. Quinn

NMLS ID #211652 Arizona, Loan Consultant


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APR vs. Interest Rate, What’s the Difference?

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Recently one of the Realtors I work closely with asked me what the actual difference between APR (annual percentage rate) and the Interest rate. Well, there is a big difference and when you are shopping for a home mortgage you are going to want to pay attention to a lot more than just the APR that is being offered by a lender. The short answer to this question is that simple interest is only the interest you pay on the loan whereas the APR is an informational number that covers some of costs of obtaining a residential loan, including points, interest, lender administration fees, mortgage insurance and various title fees.
In the case of a mortgage, the annual percentage rate, or APR, is the total yearly cost of financing a home, expressed as a percentage of the amount financed.
The federal Truth in Lending Act requires the lender to disclose both the nominal rate and the APR. Loans are frequently offered on different terms. Loan terms from different lenders can make it hard to figure out which offer is truly the best one.
The APR disclosed can be rounded up or down to the nearest one-eighth of a percentage point. Both the APR & simple interest rate must be advertised in the same font size or APR may be larger in print.
What this all means is that the APR of a loan is essentially a consumer tool designed to assist people when looking to make a major purchase. On the other hand, you have your simple interest rate. This is a very straight forward percentage that will be applied to your loan and determines your monthly payment.
People can use APR to get a general idea of what you will be looking at long term, but when it comes down to it people need to not be hesitant to ask lenders questions. Call them and find out what exactly their APR includes and what other fees are to be expected. You can also talk to your realtor and ask them about different lenders they have worked with. It’s never a bad thing to get a second opinion. Especially from a professional who is there to get you into your new home or assist you your refinance transaction.
For any questions or suggestions please feel free to email me at Ingrid.Quinn@CobaltMortage.com or visit me at http://www.CobaltMortgage.com/IngridQuinn or http://www.ScottsdaleMortgageExpert.com .


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Rumor: Loans Are Hard to Get

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I receive phone calls on a daily basis from people looking for a mortgage. They want to get prequalified to purchase a home and most want to have the rumor “It’s hard to get a loan nowadays” dispelled. There are a lot of mortgage options available:

1. Conventional conforming loans- up to 97% loan to values to $417,000 or higher depending on area of the country loan is placed
2. FHA loans- 96.5% loan to values
3. VA loans- 100% loan to values for veterans & military personnel
4. Jumbo loans- loan amounts over conventional conforming loan limits
5. UDSA- 100% loan to value rural area loans
6. Private/hard money loans
7. Home Equity loans

So where is this bad information coming from? Media, banks, mom & dad, professionals in your life? Getting a loan is not that hard. You need decent credit (not super excellent), a job, and cash for a down payment and closing costs potentially, depending on the type of financing you are eligible for.

Many times the clients I talk to are referred from agents that were supposed to take the client out to look at a rental. If they can afford an $800-$3500 rent payment for example, they may be able to buy a home.

It is important for the consumer to get re-educated on the market today when they are looking to make any kind of move, renting or purchasing, so they know their options and have a plan in place. Many people are surprised when I tell them you can qualify to purchase now. With the market improving and interest rates at historic lows still, now is a great time to buy a home! If you have any questions or comments, I would love to hear from you. I can be reached at Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or http://www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or http://www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


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Where did that Money Come From!? Documenting Cash to Close

  Cash to Close

    It seems like recently I have been running into the same issue with many of my clients. Where is their cash to close coming from to purchase a new home? I have a couple in particular that just got married and, of course, received a stack of cash and checks as gifts from their guests.

   On their January bank statement a $10,000 lump sum deposit appeared and in turn questions arose. Luckily for them we are now in April.

   Loan requirements are your most recent 1-2 months bank statements. If we had needed to use January’s bank statement my clients would have been in a bit of a predicament. Can you imagine being required to hunt down gift letters from every single guest at your wedding?

   Another instance was a young man was selling his ATV for cash to close. I’m glad he informed me of this so we could take the proper steps to document the funds.

   When you have an asset that there is a title or a document showing your ownership prior to selling or transferring ownership, please take the time to make a copy! We need a copy of the bill of sale and to fully cover your bases have the buyer pay in a cashiers check. Any cash transaction is not documentable.

   If any of the bank statements show deposits that are not payroll deposits & are over 25% of you monthly gross income, the source of those deposits should be documented (For example: gifts, inheritance, liquidation of stocks, etc.). All mortgage program guidelines require a full paper trail on where these deposits originated, copies of checks, deposit slips, etc. If any of the bank statements have more than one page, a copy of all pages are required, even if the other pages don’t show anything important or are blank. Depending on how long the transaction takes you may need to send in updated statements as you get them.

   Copies of the most recent statements (or most recent quarterly statement) on any other asset accounts (like stocks, CD’s, 401k, IRA, etc.) are required. If these assets are going to be liquidated or borrowed against evidence of that is needed, and evidence of the deposit of the funds into the new account (such as deposit slips and copies of the check).

   You are entering into a major financial transaction when purchasing a home! The best thing for you to do is to be upfront and honest with your loan officer from the very beginning because anything that is not disclosed upfront tends to cause problems near the end of the transaction process. Your loan officer is your advocate and will fight for you to get the loan you need to buy your home. Be honest with them and let them work for you! For questions or comments, please contact me at Ingrid.quinn@cobaltmortgage.com or visit my websites at www.scottsdalemortgageexpert.com or www.cobaltmortgage.com/ingridquinn.


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Closing Costs, What Are you Paying For?!

  Buyer-Seller-Rd-SignWhen you purchase a home, there are many things to keep in mind, especially pertaining to financing. As a buyer, you need to be prepared for not only your down payment on the home but also closing costs. These are the fees affiliated with the loan and the purchase transaction being processed and closed.

   You pay closing costs to the Title Company, state/county/city, lender, and you also pay tax and insurance escrows, and per diem interest. The closing costs that you pay the lender are usually far less expensive than you pay to the other parties. All costs and down payment funds are paid at the closing table to the Title Company and they are then dispersed to the various entities/vendors that the fees are owed to.

   The following are the seller concessions that the seller can pay on top of splitting the transfer & recordation taxes (if applicable, splitting these taxes is customary in many areas) In Arizona, it is standard in the resale contract for the seller to pay the Owner’s Title Insurance. Sellers may pay up to 3% of the sale price towards a buyer’s closing costs, escrows, and per diem interest, on a conventional loan with a 5% down payment.

   Sellers can pay up to 6% of the sale price to the borrower’s closing costs, escrows, and per diem interest on a loan with a 10% or 20% down payment. On FHA loans a seller is allowed to pay up to 6%. On VA loans, the seller may pay all closing costs for the veteran.

   On an investment property the maximum seller credit for closing costs is 2% of the sales price.

 

   Here is a list of some fees that are included in closing costs:

-Application Fee (if any)

-Loan Origination Charges

-Points

-Appraisal Fee

-Prepaid Interest

-Private Mortgage Insurance

-FHA, VA and Rural Housing Fees

-Home Owners Insurance

-Flood Determination Fee

-Property Survey Costs

-Title/Escrow Fees/Title Insurance

 

   Your lender will give you an estimate of closing costs on the purchase of a particular house you’ve selected. This is called a “Good Faith Estimate” (“GFE”) and it is required by law to be given to a buyer. Then, the day or before closing, the Title Company will give you an actual “Settlement Statement” (aka “the HUD” or “the HUD-1”), which is the final and complete form with all the numbers for the sale, including the actual closing costs.

   There are many different ways of handling the cost to close, including “buyer assist”. The best idea you can do is sit down with either your realtor, financial adviser or a loan officer and simply ask. They will be more than willing to answer any questions and make sure you are truly ready to buy! If you have any questions please feel free to email me at Ingrid.quinn@cobalmortgage.com